Are You a Maki or a Yaro?

I stumbled across a post about two Internet marketing blogs at IttyBiz regarding two bloggers who live at doshdosh, Maki and Entrepreneurs Journey, Yaro.

I’m not going into what the post said, merely pointing it out as the kick start to this post.

Two blogs, both quite different in style, some shared objectives and some different objectives. But both are successful. Yaro has a subscription-only-see-it-if-you-pay forum/blog where he teaches how to blog. Maki on the other hand has a few adverts to pay the bills and a few other sites dotted around the place.

The two blogs have excellent advice for someone wanting to make money out of blogging and wanting to market their blog on the internet. If someone asks me, “how do I make money blogging?”. I would say read both these blogs from start to finish, along with problogger.net and then come back and ask the same question.

But, personally I would say I am a Maki man, rather than a Yaro man. I find Maki raises more questions than he answers and I like that. There is a point where you want a little more than ABC, a more in depth look at what is going on without being sold one of those Online Marketing courses which contain 15,000 CD’s, with a book the length of The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire and has a sales letter with the “But wait, there’s more”.

And in the end I honestly don’t think such courses are what most people really need. Most people would get more benefit from being bashed about the head with a huge e-book than reading it.

I think marketing at the people who buy the 15,000 CD marketing courses will always make money because you are selling to a hungry crowd. I have even bought a few of these types of courses, and whilst I can say I learned, the lesson was not what they were teaching. The lesson was that the same amount of money could buy me a fantastic library from Amazon containing the wit and wisdom of the greatest minds in marketing ever.

Sure, these forest killing courses could teach you a few tips and mechanical aspects, but the real thing to learn is to change how you perceive things.

It is not what you know, it’s how you think.

And that’s why I like Maki’s blog more, it makes me think. Whilst Yaro simply gives me the ABC, which as I have said, is important but at some point in your blogging career you just don’t need it anymore.

It’s the same with Darren Rowse at problogger.net, I think I spent 2005 and 2006 reading everything he wrote, but there comes a point of graduation. When you no longer need the “Top Ten Tips to Write a Blog Post”.

I think it’s important to know that different blogs provide different things and at some point, you may no longer need to spend your time reading, rather, you need to be writing.

Again, I would recommend any of the bloggers mentioned.

This blog for instance, has a very tightly focussed audience, I really only aim for a few hundred readers a week and is a lead generator for linkbait clients. Although that is changing, but more of that later.

Comments

  1. says

    I like how you finish the post, “…that is changing, but more of that later.”

    That’s where I’d add a little reminder to subscribe to the feed, although you mention that you’re only aiming for a few hundred readers a week.

    To be honest, when I first saw the question, I figured you as neither of these people, but rather standing on a different podium. You don’t display ads, or sell subscriptions. You keep your blog clean as a means of promotion, letting your content bring more clients. It’s quite similar to my method.

  2. Lyndoman says

    Ahhh, the post could have been written with a smidge more clarity. I mean, whose blog do you prefer, not what kind of blogger are you.

    I agree, I am not like either, but I have different objectives.

    The, “…that is changing, but more of that later.” is about something I am dying to talk about but can’t because I am trying to follow a plan, but I have a big mouth so it’s hard to stop leakage.

  3. says

    There are times when you need both styles. On my own blog I mix it up. On Aaron Walls blog I like the way he has all sorts of styles, from rants about Google through to philosophical musings. We do tend to graduate up from step by step to thought provoking but even grizzled veterans need instructions from time to time.

  4. says

    Well put, and same here.

    Yaro’s blog: I don’t follow. I tried to but I can’t be a “fan” (I was born to be a superstar ^_^)

    Darren’s blog: I read because everyone does. Though it’s not what it used to be (or as you say, I have graduated)

    Maki’s blog: I read it because I want to/can’t live without it. Authentic advice, no garbage.

  5. says

    I remember reading Naomi’s post on Maki and Yaro and thinking how two people approached a similar topic in such a radically different way. I think one benefit of going the more public route that Maki goes, too, is that you have more freedom to really provoke and inspire and provide information beyond that which would be expected were you paying $XXX a month with the sole purpose of making money blogging.

    Maki makes you think about issues that go well beyond making money online and his posts are so insightful, you almost feel like you want to buy something from him as a way to say thanks!

  6. says

    I think Maki is more like the kind of author and blogger that I like as well. Yaro has a cool site but like Jonathan Feilds said “Maki makes you think about issues that go well beyond making money online and his posts are so insightful, you almost feel like you want to buy something from him as a way to say thanks!”
    That’s how I feel too, I tried to hire him once based on what others said and how well his site was put together.
    Like Lyndoman says though -
    “I think it’s important to know that different blogs provide different things and at some point, you may no longer need to spend your time reading, rather, you need to be writing.”
    I like the way you put things Lyndoman.

  7. says

    “Most people would get more benefit from being bashed about the head with a huge e-book than reading it.”

    I couldn’t agree more. After getting suckered in to buying a couple of eBooks back when the fad first took off, I couldn’t help noticing how poorly written most are, and how repetitive they tend to be. If you read one “I’ll teach you how to get filthy rich” eBook with its all-cap hyped headlines and superficial information, you’ve read them all. You’ll just be poorer for the experience.

    Like you, I’d rather spend my money at Amazon.

  8. says

    “but wait, there’s more”

    vs

    “Although that is changing, but more of that later”

    Just chuck in some text highlighted with a yellow box and we’re there! ;)

  9. says

    I don’t get the sense that Yaro is one of those hype-driven, money-harvesting marketers.

    Yes, he writes for people who want to make money online – after all, his blog is called “Entrepreneur’s Journey”, but I have found him to be completely generous with what he gives for free, and very authentic.

    I think the problem in the marketplace is the hungry crowd who would rather buy another “big pack” than sit down and work through the ten they already have on the shelf and actually get a business started.

    I don’t think Maki, Yaro, or Darren are exploiting that crowd the way some internet marketers are. (look at Social Media Inspector, for example -
    http://hubpages.com/hub/Social-Media-Inspector-Scam – that is outright exploitation of the ignorant!)

    It’s a shame that the hungry ignorant millions-with-no-effort opportunity-seekers exist, and that they fall for the yellow highlighting and inflated claims in the sales letters, but I don’t think Yaro is out to take advantage of them.

  10. says

    I think that while both give similar advice, I think that the major difference between the two is their approach. After six months of reading Yaro, I feel like there’s always a catch and that every post is just prepping me for a sale. Of course Yaro doesn’t force you to buy, but that feeling is always there making me question the motives behind what I’m reading.

    I don’t get that feeling at DoshDosh. It’s more of being given something with no strings.

  11. says

    I’d say both. I would follow Maki to crank out a lot of very high quality content. And monetize it later by following Yaro, although I won’t do a lot of what he does. His marketing style is a bit too aggresive in my opinion.

    Will Maki keep on with the model? That’s a question only Maki could answer.

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